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Course Descriptions

101-102 General Biology
This sequence of science electives satisfies the science requirements of non-science majors. The first semester of BI101 provides students with a foundation in biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, form and function of the major systems of plants and animals. The second semester of BI102 covers topics in behavior, evolution, ecology and comparative survey of the major groups of organisms. Topics and concepts are presented in the context of current events and the development of scientific literacy. This course also includes guest lecturers from the Humanities and the Sciences that make connections with Biology and support the liberal arts mission of the college. Note: this course is not designed for students interested in graduate programs in the health care field or majors administered by the Biology Department. Those students must enroll in General Biology for science majors (see BI103 and BI104 below).

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week for two semesters. Four credits, each semester.

103-104 General Biology
A study of the diversity of cellular and organismal life, including foundation principles in cell biology, biochemistry, genetics and evolution. For Biology, Natural Science, Biochemistry and Environmental Science majors.

Note: Students preparing for graduate programs in the health care field are expected to take BI103 and BI104. Under special circumstances and permission of the Chair, these courses can be taken in any sequence (i.e., 103 followed by 104 or 104 followed by 103.

Note that 103 is only offered in the fall and 104 only in the spring semesters).

Three hours of lecture, and three hours of laboratory each week for two semesters. Four credits, each semester.

107 Elementary Biochemistry
Designed primarily for students enrolled in the College's Nursing Program, the course aims to develop an understanding of and appreciation for the chemical basis of life. Fundamental principles of general, organic and biological chemistry are covered with a special emphasis on clinical applications. Adequate preparation for this course includes a working knowledge of high school level algebra.

Note: this course is not open to Biochemistry, Biology, Environmental Science or Natural Science Majors.
Three hours of lecture, one hour of recitation, and two hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Five credits.

108 Microbiology
This course focuses on the general principles underlying the life processes of microorganisms. Topics include microbial cell structure, metabolism, genetics, and growth characteristics. Emphasis is given to disease-causing (pathogenic) microorganisms and the various systems of defense employed by the human host. Note: this course is not open to Biochemistry, Biology, Environmental Science or Natural Science Majors.

Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

201 Exercise Physiology
This lecture course employs a scientific approach to the study of sport and exercise by examining the connections between human athletic performance, the anatomical structure of the body, and the physiological processes that allow the body to function in an efficient manner. Topics covered will include the anatomy and physiology of the skeletal, muscular, respiratory, and cardiovascular systems as they relate to athletic performance; effects of athletic training on the structure and function of the human body; techniques for fitness assessment and performance optimization in sport; and exercise and athletics as critical elements of a healthy lifestyle. In addition to gaining a scientific understanding of the effects of exercise, students will be taught practical methods for examining their own personal fitness.

Three hours of lecture each week for one semester. Three credits.

Prerequisites: General Biology (BI103-104) or Human Anatomy & Physiology I and II (BI331-332) or General Biology for Non-Majors (BI102-103) with an average grade of C (2.0) or better

205 Biosphere At Risk
A study of significant global biological and ecological processes and their relation to human existence now and in the future. Throughout the course, students will examine the environmental consequences associated with contemporary issues such as human population growth, global climate change, and pollution. Students will also engage in discussions of relevant environmental issues in order to understand better how policy makers and other professionals work to solve these problems. Required for Environmental Science majors and open to non-science majors, the course does not satisfy the College's laboratory science requirement.

Three hours of lecture each week for one semester. Three credits.

Prerequisite: Two semesters of college-level laboratory science

210 Field Botany
This course is designed to introduce students to the flora of the northeast temperate deciduous forest ecosystem through a combination of lecture and field-oriented class work. Field work will focus on the identification and ecology of common tree, shrub, and herb species. The course will also address the ethnobotanical uses of select native plants, the impact of invasive plants on local ecosystems, and the natural history of the region.

Three hours of lecture each week for one semester. Three credits.

Prerequisite: Two semesters of college-level laboratory science

315 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy
This course undertakes a study of the anatomy of vertebrates, with emphasis on the comparative structure, function, and development of vertebrate body forms and organ systems. Additional emphasis is placed on understanding the evolutionary relationships among vertebrates in light of their anatomical structure. Extensive laboratory work includes dissection of aquatic and terrestrial vertebrate forms. This course will be offered in alternating years.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

318 Microbiology for Majors
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of general and clinical microbiology. The general microbiology component is a study of the principles underlying the basic life processes of microorganisms, and topics include microbial cell structure, genetics, metabolism, and growth characteristics. The clinical microbiology is a focus on the interactions between microorganisms and the human body. Topics include normal microbiota, pathogenic microorganisms, mechanisms of disease, defense systems of the host, nosocomial infections, and the use of antibiotics to control infection. In the laboratory, students gain hands-on experience with the microscope, aseptic technique, bacterial staining techniques, biochemical testing, and ELISA.

Three hours of lecture/seminar and three hours of lab each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

319 Aquatic Ecology
An introduction to the ecology of freshwater systems including rivers and streams, lakes, and wetlands. Students will be exposed to both theoretical and practical concepts of freshwater ecology. Topics include biotic communities (macrophytes, zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates, fish and other vertebrates), species interactions, biodiversity issues, biotic indices and biomonitoring, pollution, habitat degradation, and conservation. This course has a strong field component and is designed primarily for Biology, Environmental Science, and Natural Science majors. This course will be offered in alternating years.

The equivalent of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

320 Ecology
This course surveys the interactions between organisms and their physical and biological environments in three integrated modules: ecophysiology and ecosystems, population biology, and community ecology. Each module comprises lectures on key topics, case studies in classic or current papers, computer models and collection and analysis of field data. Given the constantly evolving nature of this field, this course emphasizes understanding of the relative strengths of various hypotheses based on current evidence.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

324 Developmental Biology
A lecture, seminar and laboratory study of embryonic development, including cellular differentiation, molecular control and gene regulation. The anatomy, physiology and genetics of developmental processes from gametogenesis to senescence, with emphasis on early embryonic life, will be studied. Laboratory work will include anatomical observation and experimental intervention. This course will be offered in alternating years.

Four hours of lecture each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

325 Evolutionary Biology
This course focuses on topics at the microevolutionary level such as the agents of evolutionary change leading to speciation and isolating mechanisms between species. It also addresses macroevolution, history of life on earth, systematics and biogeography.

Three hours of lecture each week for one semester. Three credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

327 Genetics
This course focuses on the molecular biology of gene expression. Topics include a brief review of classical genetics, structure-function of DNA, and the regulation of gene expression in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The laboratory is composed of a series of experiments utilizing current molecular biology techniques including PCR, construction of recombinant DNA molecules, gel electrophoresis and Southern analysis.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

328 Conservation Biology
A study of biodiversity and the processes that lead to species rarity and extinction. Topics include speciation theory, genetic variation, populations, species interactions, disturbance regimes, invasive species and community and ecosystem level conservation and restoration. Emphasis on scientifically sound strategies for conserving species in both terrestrial and aquatic systems. This course has a strong field component and will be offered in alternating years.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

329 Plant Biology
A study of plant biology across a range of scales, from cells that compose individuals, to populations, communities and ecosystems. Lecture will cover topics such as plant anatomy and physiology, mating systems and pollination, competition, plant-animal interactions and conservation. In laboratory, students will explore life-history strategies, as well as physiological and anatomical adaptations that enable plants to exist within a wide range of environmental conditions.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

330 Principles of Biotechnology
Biotechnology employs cell culture, recombinant DNA techniques, creation of transgenic animals and molecular techniques to generate products and procedures that hold promise to advance the fields of medicine, animal science, and agriculture and to improve the quality of the environment at large. It is at the forefront of present-day applied sciences. This course will emphasize class discussion of literature relevant to the field, including comparison of historic and current methodologies employed in this evolving field and treatment of its social and ethical implications.

Note: the number of enrolled Biology Department majors will be limited to 16 students.

Four hours of lecture each week for one semester. Four Credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

331-332 Human Anatomy & Physiology I and II
The structure and function of human cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems are considered. The interdependence of these systems is emphasized and related to the total field of biology. Laboratory work includes the dissection of a typical mammal and completion of classical experiments of physiology.

Note: the number of enrolled Biology Department majors will be limited to 16 students.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for two semesters. Four credits, each semester.

333 Cell Biology
A study of the anatomy and physiology of the fundamental unit of life. The laboratory will investigate the structure and vital processes of prokaryotes and eukaryotes, with particular attention to membranes, organelles, and macromolecules.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

334 Animal Physiology
The function of the organs and organ systems of animals. Topics include feeding and digestion, circulation, gas transport, water balance and aspects of endocrinology. Basic physiological techniques and methods will be examined in laboratory sessions.

This course will be offered in alternating years.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

335 Animal Behavior
This course is an introduction to the basic principles underlying the behavior of animals. Students will gain an understanding of the mechanisms and evolutionary causes that drive behaviors observed in all types of animals (insects, fish, birds, and mammals). Upon completing this course, students will have acquired experiences in observing and recording animal behaviors through laboratory- and field-based studies.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

336 Biochemistry
A review of the structure and function of biologically important molecules and their role in the catabolic and anabolic processes of the cell. The laboratory sessions stress development of a working knowledge of standard procedures useful in a wide range of experimental situations.

Three hours of lecture, one hour of recitation, and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Five credits.

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry, BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

338 Invertebrate Zoology
This course surveys living animal diversity in extant phyla, emphasizing the relationship between form and function. Laboratory exercises build skills in classification and anatomy through integrative study of prepared slides, dissections, preserved specimens and observation of live animals. Approximately one third of the course is a project extending class material to subjects relevant to the student's major interest, such as medical and forensic entomology, parasitology, or model systems in neurobiology, ecology, genetics, development, etc.

Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

339 Endocrinology
This course will treat the organization and function of the major vertebrate endocrine glands. For each gland, the synthesis, release and delivery of chemical signals will be discussed together with the effects those secretions have on their target cells. The relationship between the nervous system and endocrine system will also be examined to explore how these control systems work together to maintain homeostasis. A variety of pathophysiologies linked to endocrine malfunction will also be discussed. This course will be offered in alternating years.

Note: the number of enrolled Biology Department majors will be limited to 16 students.

Three hours of lecture each week for one semester. Three credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

340 Field Studies in Tropical Biology
This course introduces students to the biological complexity of the tropics through participatory field experiences at tropical locations in the ecologically diverse Central American country of Belize. Field trips and exercises are conducted in two of the most species-rich ecosystems on the planet, the neo-tropical rainforest and coral reef. Saint Anselm faculty and local experts will lecture on a variety of topics including the natural history of tropical biota, patterns of species diversity, rainforest ecology and conservation, ethnobiology, and coral reef ecology.

This is an intensive two-week summer course. Four credits.

Prerequisite: Two semesters of college-level laboratory science. Permission of the instructors.

341 Selected Topics in Biochemistry
This course is designed to meet the needs and interests of junior biochemistry majors foremost, but also those of upper level biology and chemistry majors with interests in biochemistry and molecular biology. The current design of the course includes in-depth analysis of protein structure- function relationships and an up-to-date look at the subjects of signal transduction pathways and cancer biochemistry. Laboratory exercises emphasize techniques applied to the study of rare proteins.

Three hours of lecture, one hour of recitation, and three hours of laboratory each week for one semester. Five credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

344 Nutrition
An introduction to the science of nutrition focusing on biochemical foundations (carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals) as they apply to human health (diet, physical activity, and healthful considerations for, for example, fluid balance, and bone and blood health). Eating disorders, food safety, nutrition through the life cycle, and global/cultural considerations are also covered. This course will be offered in alternating years.

Note: the number of enrolled Biology Department majors will be limited to 16 students.

Three hours of lecture each week for one semester. Three credits.

345 Biostatistics
An introduction to the fundamentals of statistics and the application of statistical analyses in biological research. Sampling, parametric and non- parametric techniques and the presentation of data are also covered. Assignments involve spreadsheet calculations and use of statistical software. Required for Biology and Environmental Science majors.

Note: the number of enrolled Biology Department majors will be limited to 20 students.

Three hours of lecture each week for one semester. Three credits.

346 Pharmacology
An introduction to the science of pharmacology focusing on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic foundations (absorption, distribution, biotransformation, excretion, receptors, and dosing) as they apply to human health (for example cardiovascular-renal, blood, inflammation, and gout, endocrine, and chemotherapeutic agents). Drug development, laws, toxicology, and life cycle and global/cultural considerations are also covered. This course will be offered in alternating years.

Note: the number of enrolled Biology Department majors will be limited to 16 students.

Three hours of lecture each week for one semester. Three credits.

347 Ornithology
This course focuses on diversity, identification and biology of birds of the Northeastern United States. Topics covered include evolution, migration, ecology, conservation, behavior, anatomy and physiology of birds. Field laboratories constitute an important part of the course and will include some mandatory Saturday field trips. See instructor or online syllabus for details. This course will be offered in alternating years.

Note: the number of enrolled Biology Department majors will be limited to 14 students.

The equivalent of three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory each week. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

400 Independent Study
This course allows advanced study of selected topics in the biological sciences. The topic will be in chosen by a student in consultation with a faculty member who will facilitate the learning process.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Faculty Facilitator and the Chair of the Biology Department.

421-422 Directed Research in Biology - Two Semester Option
Individualized research experience in the biological sciences, under the direction of a science faculty member, including literature searching, hypothesis development and testing, graphical and statistical analysis, and oral and written presentation.

Note: Open only to upper-class students who have applied for and been admitted into a position in a science faculty's research laboratory.

Note: Two sequential semesters must be taken to earn credit.

Four credits earned upon satisfactory completion of Biology 422.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair. Permission of the faculty supervisor with whom a student wishes to work.

423 Directed Research in Biology - One Semester Option
Individualized research experience in the biological sciences, under the direction of a science faculty member, including literature searching, hypothesis development and testing, graphical and statistical analysis, and oral and written presentation. Note: Open only to upper-class students who have applied for and been admitted into a position in a science faculty's research laboratory.

Note: This is an intensive one-semester research course that can be taken as an alternative to the typical year-long BI421-422 sequence. Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair. Permission of the faculty supervisor with whom a student wishes to work.

449 Special Topics in Biology
This course allows advanced study of selected topics not covered in other Biology Department course offerings. Topics covered will be chosen by the Biology Department and will reflect areas of importance within the biological sciences.

Four credits.

Prerequisite: BI103-104 or equivalent as determined by Department Chair

450 Washington Internship
After application to and acceptance by the Washington Center, students are placed in a relevant field experience with scientific organizations in the greater Washington, D.C. area. Selection for this typically fall semester program is completed in the preceding spring semester.

Note: BI450 is equivalent to five academic courses.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Internship Facilitator of the Biology Department.

451-452 Biology Internship
Qualified students may be offered the opportunity to develop, with the aid of the Internship Facilitator of the Department, an internship experience relevant to their academic needs. Assessment will be based on a portfolio that includes the agency's outcome assessment, the student's objective and subjective journal, and a primary-source referenced term paper in an area allied to the internship.
BI451 and BI452 are typically the equivalent of one or two academic courses. Students have participated in internships with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, the Wells National Estuarine Research Reserve, the Piscataquog Watershed Association, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, Optima Health, New Hampshire Custom Brewers, the University of New Hampshire Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, the Southern Maine Regional Genetics Service Program, the Foundation for Blood Research, Covino Environmental Associates, Catholic Medical Center, members of the Congress of the United States, and the Fitness Network, among many other organizations.

Prerequisite: Permission of the Internship Facilitator of the Biology Department.