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Course Descriptions

Course Offerings: Accounting

AC111 Financial Accounting
Presents accounting concepts leading to the preparation of a company's financial statements. Reviews the importance of good accounting information for the capital market and for proper decision making within a company. At the end of the course, a student should be able to prepare financial statements for a small company.

AC112 Cost Accounting
Presents the processes by which a company determines the cost of a product or service and the various internal reporting mechanisms to allow management to make proper business decisions. The development of the various components leading to an operating plan for a company are presented. Additionally, common business decisions faced by a company are reviewed.
Prerequisite: Accounting 111

AC211-212 Intermediate Accounting I - II
Designed to build on the knowledge obtained from Financial Accounting. Theory and concepts are integrated to give the student a working knowledge of current practices and policies in the accounting profession. Opinions and policies of leading professional and research organizations are discussed and applied to practical situations through the use of problems and exercises.
Prerequisite: Accounting 112 or permission of the instructor

AC213 Federal Income Taxation I
Federal Income Taxation for individuals is covered in this course. At the conclusion of this course, a student should be able to complete their own tax return as well as the tax return for a typical middle class home owning (or non-home owning) family with children and investments. The earned income credit as well as the other primary refundable and nonrefundable credits is covered giving the student the ability to help low income individuals or families. The student should also be able to complete the basic tax return of a sole proprietorship and calculate the self-employment tax at the conclusion of this course. Additionally, basic tax planning is reviewed to provide the opportunity to allow better financial decisions to be made. Non business majors are encouraged to take this course.

AC214 Federal Income Taxation II
Federal taxation of corporations, partnerships and Subchapter S
Corporations are covered in this course and basic tax returns will be
prepared for each entity. Additionally, business depreciation is covered and the basic tax planning concepts for a business are reviewed.
Prerequisite: Accounting 213

AC215 Accounting Information Systems
Examines typical business processes, including Sales/Accounts Receivable/ Collections and Purchases/Accounts Payable/Payment. Objectives and procedures of internal control, business documents and reports as well as proper system documentation through flow-charts and other techniques will be examined. Hands-on experience will provide exposure to a Computer Based Accounting Information System. Requires computer work in class. If the class is not scheduled to meet in a computer lab, students will be expected to bring a laptop or other computer that can run Excel and download software intended for use in a PC.
Prerequisite: Accounting 111

AC311 Advanced Accounting
This course reviews accounting for higher level accounting issues such as purchases of a business and business consolidations. Accounting for international operations is reviewed as well as partnership accounting. Recent developments in reporting issues, including convergence of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles and International Financial Reporting Standards will be covered.
Prerequisite: Accounting 212

AC313 Auditing
Auditing introduces the student to the role of the auditor in a specialized area of accounting known as "auditing." During the semester, auditing philosophy and theory related to the examination of financial statements and internal control are studied. Auditing standards, objectives, and procedures developed by the accounting profession, as well as the legal and ethical responsibilities of the independent auditor, are discussed.
Prerequisite: Accounting 212 or Instructor's permission

AC411 Special Topics: Accounting

Course Offerings: Business

BU103 Personal Finance for Non Business Majors (Juniors and Seniors Only)
A comprehensive overview of the financial facts of everyday life. The course covers topics including but not limited to budgeting, taxes, home and car buying, insurances (home, car, health and life) as well as stocks, bonds and mutual funds.

BU121 Business Statistics
The study of measures of central tendency, measures of variation, probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square, regression, and correlation. Applications to economics and business are made throughout the course.

BU232 Integrated Marketing Communications
Investigation of the methods used by organizations to create dialogue with various constituencies to create long-term, mutually beneficial relationships. Emphasizes maximizing communication impact in an ethical, socially responsible fashion by conveying consistent reinforcing messages using combinations of one- and two-way methods of communication.

BU233 Consumer Behavior
Examines how/why consumers acquire, use, and dispose of goods and services and the implications of these behaviors for marketing. The course is built on a conceptual foundation of cognitive psychology, learning theory, sociology, literary criticism, communication, and cultural anthropology.

BU221 Human Resource Management
Provides an introduction to the theory and practice of human resource management in a business setting. Topics include legal issues in employment, job analysis, recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, and compensation.

BU222 Women and Men in Business
This course focuses on gender issues that arise in the workplace, or in relation to work. Topics covered include occupational segregation, gender stereotypes, sexual harassment, pay equity and comparable worth, and gender differences in communication and decision-making.

BU223 Organizational Behavior
This is a theory oriented course that addresses understanding organizational behavior on three levels: individual, group and macro (organizations or departments). Cases are used to illustrate dilemmas confronted by managers, and there is an emphasis on applying theory to understand and solve organizational problems.

BU224 Management Science
Focuses on the diverse activities required to conduct a business efficiently and effectively. Quantitative techniques used to enhance economic performance are emphasized.
Prerequisite: A course in statistics.

BU231 Principles of Marketing
Introduction to the role of marketing within an organization. Topics include identifying and defining markets, basic elements of marketing programs, building customer relationships, and the effect of environmental factors on marketing. Marketing applications in domestic and international, profit and not-for-profit, industrial and consumer markets, small and large organizations, and physical goods and services contexts will be included.
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or above

BU321 Business Law
The law applicable to everyday business transactions, including contracts, agency, sales, partnerships, corporations, and negotiable instruments.

BU322 International Business Management
The objective of the course is to familiarize students with the issues and the environment that impact the international operations of multi-national firms. The emphasis will be on the managerial viewpoint rather than that of the social science approach.

BU323 Seminar in Business
This is a course in strategic management, which integrates students' understanding of a number of business disciplines. A computer simulation allows real time decision making in product development, marketing, production and finance. Students work in teams to achieve competitive advantage for their "companies". Requires computer work in class. If the class is not scheduled to meet in a computer lab, students will be expected to bring a laptop or other computer that can run Excel.

BU331 Marketing Management
This course builds on Principles of Marketing to develop decision making skills through case studies of actual marketing problems. Both qualitative and quantitative analyses will be used to determine the financial, organizational, competitive, and strategic impact of marketing decisions. Problems related to various marketing mix components, types of organizations, and types of products will be included. Students are encouraged to complete FI261 (Financial Management) before registering for this course but FI261 is not a formal pre-requisite for BU331.
Prerequisites: Business 231

BU332 Marketing Research
Introduction to the marketing research process, research design, and methods used to obtain, analyze, and interpret information needed for making marketing decisions. Class projects will provide experience in sampling, methods for collecting and analyzing data (including Internet techniques), and evaluating/reporting findings.
Prerequisites: Business 121, 231

BU333 International Marketing
International Marketing studies how companies attempt to internationalize their operations, providing an analytic framework for the development and implementation of global marketing programs. The course will examine key management decisions connected with the global marketing process, including: whether to internationalize; which markets to enter; how to enter the foreign market; how to design the global marketing program; and how to implement and control the marketing program. The course will combine class discussion, practical problem solving, and case analysis.
Prerequisite: Business 231

BU400 Independent Study

BU421 Special Topics: Business
Within a seminar format, an in-depth examination of an issue of current interest within the business environment. Topics will be selected by the department's faculty.

BU481 Internship (4 credits)
Students are placed in a field experience situation with professional organizations.
Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator.

BU485 Internship (8 credits)
Students are placed in a field experience situation with professional organizations.
Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator

BU486, BU487, BU488 Washington/New York Internship
Students are placed in a field experience in Washington, D.C., or in New
York City during the Summer term.
Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator

BU487, BU488, BU489 Washington/New York Internship
Students are placed in a field experience in Washington, D.C., or New York
City during the Fall and Spring semesters.
Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator.

BU490 (16 credits) Washington D.C. Internship Program
Saint Anselm College maintains partnership agreements with The Washington Center and the Washington Internship Institute. Students are placed in a field experience in Washington for the semester. Washington D.C. internships are open to all majors and are administered by The Center for Experiential Learning. Hours for internship are between 35-40 hours per week. Distance learning technology is utilized for the review and submission of all assignments
Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator.

BU500 (16) New York City Internship Program
Students are placed in a field experience in New York City for the semester. New York City internships are open to all majors and are administered by The Center for Experiential Learning. Hours for internship are between 35-
40 hours per week. Distance learning technology is utilized for the review and submission of all assignments.
Prerequisite: Permission of the coordinator.

Course Offerings: Economics

EC141 Principles of Economics: Micro
Examines the concept of the firm and the way it operates in the economy. Topics such as price determination, resource allocation, costs, and welfare are examined.

EC142 Principles of Economics: Macro
Designed to give the student a basic understanding of the national economy through a study of economic theory. Topics include unemployment, inflation, economic growth, the business cycle, and government stabilization policy.

EC241 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis
Presents a theoretical and empirical analysis of aggregate income, employment, growth and fluctuations. The classical, Keynesian and New Keynesian models of aggregate economic theory and activity are analyzed. The instruments of macroeconomic policy and their effect on the economy are also discussed.
Prerequisite: Economics 142

EC242 Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis
This course presents the economic theory of demand, production and supply for different markets, in partial and general equilibrium. Economic models of consumer and business behavior are developed. Various current business strategies and government policies are then examined as applications of these models.
Prerequisite: Economics 141

EC243 Money and Banking
This course examines the financial system by exploring the function of banks and other financial institutions in the determination of money in the economy. Particular attention is paid to the behavior of interest rates, government regulation of the financial system, and the conduct of monetary policy.
Prerequisite: Economics 142

EC244 Economics of Industrial Organization
This course provides an economic analysis of US industries by examining their market structures, conduct and performance. Various business strategies available within oligopoly and monopoly markets are evaluated within a framework of two competing schools of thought. Public policy regarding monopoly and oligopoly is examined through several case studies.
Prerequisite: Economics 141

EC245 Labor Economics
This course adds to students' knowledge of principles of microeconomic theory and applies this theory to labor markets. A significant part of the
course will be spent analyzing public policy issues regarding the workplace. Examples of topics covered are: the decision to work; the firm's mix of workers and hours; the minimum wage; discrimination; education and training decisions; labor unions; immigration; and unemployment.
Prerequisite: Economics 141

EC247 International Economics
Studies the theoretical and policy determinations of international trade flows, balance of payments, exchange rate adjustments and capital flows. Examines the institutional structures which integrate and accommodate trade and payment flows in world economy.
Prerequisite: Economics 141, 142

EC250 Environmental Economics
Microeconomics is applied to problems of the environment. The impact of incentives, externalities, public good and property rights on pollution are studied. Cost-benefit analysis is applied to real world problems in cases where the benefits and/or costs may be very difficult to measure Current environmental laws and policies in the US are examined along with their effects. Global issues are discussed, including climate change and the tension between development and the environment in developing countries.
Prerequisite: Economics 141

EC341 Seminar in Economics
Current topics in the field of economics are discussed using the case-study approach.
Prerequisite: Economics141, 142

EC342 Econometrics
Introduction to the field of econometrics as a means of testing economic theories and providing quantitative estimates of the magnitudes of relationships among variables. Emphasis is on regression analysis using Ordinary Least Squares and other techniques when OLS cannot be used.
Prerequisite: Economics 141, 142, Business 121

EC344 Sports Economics
Applies economic tools to study the field of sports. Topics include the organization of sports leagues, profit maximization, the application of antitrust to sports, competitive balance, labor relations, gender and racial discrimination, and the economic impact of sports on cities and states.
Prerequisite: Economics 141

EC345 Economics of the Great Depression
Gives the students a background to understand the Great Depression. Explains what actually happened vs. the conflicting narratives presented by modern competing economic theories.
Prerequisite: EC141, EC142

EC441 Special Topics: Economics
This course offers, in a seminar format, the careful examination of a current topic of interest in the field of Economics. The topic will vary across semesters, but may include areas in Micro and Macroeconomics as well as History of Economic Thought.

Course Offerings: Finance

FI261 Financial Management
An analysis of the financial decision-making processes of the firm. Topics include the time value of money, risk return analysis, cash flow analysis, investment decision-making, the cost of capital, optimum capital structure, and dividend theory. Requires computer work in class. If the class is not scheduled to meet in a computer lab, students will be expected to bring a laptop or other computer that can run Excel.
Prerequisites: Accounting 111, Business 121

FI262 Investments
Introduction to various types of securities from the viewpoint of the investor, including the investment process, sources of information, and investment strategies.
Prerequisite: Accounting 111

FI361 Financial Management II
An expansion of the topics covered in Financial Management. In addition to treating the concepts of cost of capital, optimum capital structure and capital budgeting, the topics of convertible securities, leasing, mergers, and reorganizations are considered. Requires computer work in class. If the class is not scheduled to meet in a computer lab, students will be expected to bring a laptop or other computer that can run Excel.
Prerequisite: Finance 261

FI362 Portfolio Analysis
An expansion of the topic covered in Investments. Topics covered include: valuation principles, analysis and management of bonds, analysis of stocks, and portfolio theory. Requires computer work in class. If the class is not scheduled to meet in a computer lab, students will be expected to bring a laptop or other computer that can run Excel.
Prerequisite: Finance 262

FI363 International Financial Management
This course introduces the student to the theory of International Financial Management. Topics covered include: international monetary relationships and balance of payments, hedging and options, international capital budgeting and foreign investing, and international capital markets.
Prerequisites: Economics 141, 142, Finance 261

FI364 Investment Theories and Practices
This course provides a rigorous treatment of numerous theories and best practices for investment management. More specifically, this course discusses the three main theories of investment management to include: (a) fundamental investment analysis, (b) technical investment analysis, and (c) efficient market investment theory. Further, a significant portion of the course focuses on the ethics of money management.
Prerequisite: Finance 261

FI461 Special Topics: Finance
Within a seminar format, an in-depth examination of an issue of current interest within the finance environment. Topics will be selected by the department's faculty.