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Liberal Studies in the Great Books

The minor in Liberal Studies in the Great Books provides a variety of course options and a flexible sequence of study. The five courses capture well the point of reading classic texts and the opportunity to participate more fully in the ideal of liberal arts education. Accordingly, the minor is intrinsically interdisciplinary and horizon-expanding.

Required Courses

Three of the six Great Books seminars: PH261-266 One Preceptorial: PH467, 468, or 469

Select one from the following:
A fourth Great Books seminar, a second Preceptorial, PH321 Formal Logic, PH325 Metaphysics, PH331 Philosophy of Science, an English Literature course, or a Fine Arts course in history, theory, or appreciation (no studio courses.)

Courses

Great Books Seminars - The seminars provide a unique opportunity to participate in the study of the works of the major writers who have influenced the development of thought in the Western World.

261 Great Books Seminar - Greek
Selected readings are chosen from among the following: Homer, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Herodotus, Thucydides, Plato, Aristophanes, Plutarch, and Aristotle.

262 Great Books Seminar - Roman
Selected readings are chosen from among the following: Vergil, Lucretius, Cicero, Tacitus, Seneca, Plutarch, St. Augustine, and Plotinus.

263 Great Books Seminar - Medieval
Selected readings are chosen from among the following: Boethius, St. Augustine, St. Anselm, Beowulf, Dante, Song of Roland, St. Bonaventure, and St. Thomas Aquinas.

264 Great Books Seminar - Renaissance
Selected readings are chosen from among the following: Erasmus, Luther, Bacon, St. Thomas More, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Shakespeare, and Milton.

265 Great Books Seminar - Early Modern
Selected readings are chosen from among the following: Galileo, Hobbes, Descartes, Locke, Moliere, Hume, Kant, Swift, and Goethe.

266 Great Books Seminar - Late Modern
Selected readings are chosen from among the following: Madison, Hamilton, DeTocqueville, Hegel, Dostoevski, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Tolstoy, and Newman.