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Course Descriptions

101 Astronomy
An introduction to the current understanding of the universe combined with an observational component which involves familiarization with the night sky and telescopic observation of the moon, planets, stars, star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies.

102 Geology
An introduction to physical geology with emphasis on three topics: (1) the origin, classification, and identification of minerals, rocks, and related structures; (2) plate tectonics; and (3) processes that shape the earth's surface. The course does not have a separate laboratory component but some class time is used for hands-on familiarization with rock and mineral samples as well as topological map reading exercises. The course also includes one or more field trips for the investigation of local geological features.

103 Meteorology
An introduction to the physical principles that are used to understand the mechanisms that control the Earth's atmosphere. Topics covered will include: the Earth's Heat Budget, the Hydrologic Cycle, Atmospheric Stability, Cloud Formation, Global Circulation Patterns, Wave Cyclone Theory, and climate Change Theories. The class will also provide insight into understanding the fundamental science behind issues such as global climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, acid rain, and air pollution.

104 Forensic Physics
This is a one-semester course that looks at the application of physics to forensics. Topics covered include, but are not limited to, ballistics, blood spatter analysis, vehicular accidents, radiation monitoring and exposure, acoustic forensics, and combustion. This is an optional course for the Forensic Science Certificate.

111-112 Fundamentals of Physics I - II
A conceptual physics course offered to non-science majors. The mathematical knowledge necessary for the course is studied and reviewed as required. This course can be used to fulfill the general College requirement of a freshman science for non-science majors.

Three hours of lecture a week and two hours of laboratory each week for two semesters. Four credits, each semester.

121-122 General Physics I - II
An introductory physics course on of the phenomena and fundamentals of mechanics, waves, heat, electricity, magnetism, light, the atom, the nucleus, and special relativity. Some knowledge of algebra, plane geometry, and elementary trigonometry required. Calculus is not required. This course fulfills the physics requirement of students majoring in Biology and Natural Science.

Three hours of lecture, one hour of recitation, and two and one-half hours of laboratory each week for two semesters. Five credits, each semester.

131-132 Classical Physics I-II
An introductory physics course on the phenomena of mechanics, waves, heat, electricity, magnetism, and optics at a level more sophisticated than General Physics, since the emphasis is more theoretical and calculus is used as a tool. This course fulfills the physics requirement of students majoring in Physics, Chemistry, Applied Physics, and Engineering Physics (3-2 students)

Three hours of lecture, one hour of recitation, and two and one-half hours of laboratory each week for two semesters. Five credits, each semester.

Co-requisite: Mathematics 170-180 or equivalent.

231 Modern Physics
A one-semester course that naturally follows the two-semester Classical Physics sequence. Topics include special relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic structure, nuclear structure and reactions, and statistical physics.

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. Four credits.

Prerequisite: Physics 131-132 or permission of the instructor.

241 Statics
A study of rigid-body mechanics that provides a foundation for the design and analysis of structural and mechanical systems. Topics covered include force vectors, structural analysis, internal forces, and moments of inertia.

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. Four credits.

Prerequisite: Physics 131-132 or permission of the instructor.

242 Dynamics
A study of Newtonian mechanics applied to the motion of particles, systems, and rigid bodies. Topics covered include analysis in several coordinate systems, conservation laws, rigid-body analysis, and engineering concepts of dynamics.

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. Four credits.

Prerequisite: Physics 131-132 or permission of the instructor.

243 Strength of Materials
This standard course in the engineering area is referred to alternately as mechanics of solids, mechanics of materials, or strength of materials. Topics covered include stress analysis, strain, the Mohr circle, yield and failure criteria, torsion, and bending of beams.

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. Four credits.

Prerequisite: Physics 241 or permission of the instructor.

245 Electrical Circuits
This is an intermediate level course in the analysis of electrical circuits, devices, and systems. The course utilizes differential equations and other techniques to analyze circuits, including those with operational amplifiers and other active and passive elements. The course includes a laboratory and providing the basis for continued study in physics and electrical engineering.

Three hours of lecture, one hour of recitation, and three hours of laboratory, each week. Five credits.

Prerequisite: Physics 131-132 or permission of the instructor.

346 Thermodynamics
This is an intermediate level course in Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics. The course studies the laws and fundamental assumptions of thermodynamics and statistical physics, providing the framework for studies of entropy, thermodynamic cycles, and other such processes.

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. Four credits.

Prerequisite: Physics 131-132 or permission of the instructor.

347 Fluid Dynamics
This is an intermediate level course in Fluid Dynamics. The laws of mechanics and those for conservative quantities are used to analyze fluids at rest and in motion. Concepts such as; Bernoulli's law; the continuity equation; dimensional analysis; viscous flow; and boundary-layer theory; will be discussed.

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation each week. Four credits.

Prerequisites: PS131 and MA220.

380 Electricity and Magnetism
This is an intermediate level course in Electromagnetism. The course is focused on the application of mathematics at a level of differential equation to the investigation of electromagnetic phenomena. Topics such as electro- and magneto-statics, Maxwell's equations, waveguides, radiation patterns, and antenna design will be discussed.

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation, each week. Four credits.

Prerequisites: PS132 and MA220.

383 Quantum Mechanics
This is a one-semester course for students in the physical sciences, mathematics, and computing that introduces the modern formalism and phenomenology of quantum physics. It begins with a review of linear algebra before introducing the basic postulates of quantum mechanics. These postulates are used to discuss a diverse range of topics including but not limited to the hydrogen atom, SchroŐądinger's equation, Bell's theorem, and quantum computing.

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation, each week. Four credits.

Prerequisites: PS131-132 (required), PS231 (recommended), MA310 (recommended); or permission of instructor. Note: PS121-122 may be used in place of PS131-132 if the student has also taken or is planning to concurrently take MA310.

386 Mathematical Methods of Physics
This course is a discussion of mathematical methods with emphasis on their applications to physics. The topics covered include: complex numbers, complex algebra, Fourier series, integral transforms, and group theory.

Three hours of lecture and one hour of recitation, each week. Four credits.

Prerequisite: MA310 Linear Analysis and PH242 Dynamics or permission of the instructor.

400 Independent Study
Qualified students may study a topic with a professor in the department.

Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor and completion of required forms in the Office of the Registrar.

449 Topics in Physics
This course will consist of a detailed investigation of a topic important to contemporary physics. The topic will be chosen by the department for its relevance to current research in physics and its accessibility to students.

Prerequisite: Physics 131-132 and permission of the instructor.

451 Independent Research in Physics I
The student plans a research project and conducts library research under the direction of a faculty advisor. This course is recommended for Applied Physics majors and required for Physics majors. Open to qualified students in other majors with the permission of both department chairpersons. This course carries no credit, but is a prerequisite for Independent Research in Physics II.
Prerequisite: Permission of the department chairperson.

452 Independent Research in Physics II
The student conducts research under the direction of a faculty advisor. The student presents an oral report to students and faculty, writes a thesis describing his/her research, and may be required to present the results in poster presentations. This course is recommended for Applied Physics majors and required for Physics majors. Open to qualified students in other majors with the permission of both department chairpersons. Successful completion of this course earns three credits.

Prerequisite: Independent Research in Physics I and permission of the instructor.

475-476 Physics Internship
Qualified students may be offered the opportunity to develop an internship experience relevant to their academic goals. PS475 and PS476 are each typically the equivalent of one academic course. Students may not register for PS476 alone; it is be taken in conjunction with PS475. Students will earn a letter grade for PS475 and PS476 will be graded on a pass/fail basis.