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Course Descriptions

Biology


BI 107 ELEMENTARY BIOCHEMISTRY & LAB

This course seeks to develop an understanding of and appreciation for the chemical basis of life. Fundamental principles of general, organic, and biological chemistry are covered with particular emphasis on clinical applications. Adequate preparation for this course should include a working knowledge of high school level algebra.

BI 108 Microbiology & LAB

This course focuses on the general principles underlying the life processes of microorganisms. Topics include microbial cell structure, metabolism, genetics, and growth characteristics. Emphasis is given to disease-causing (pathogenic) microorganisms and the various systems of defense employed by the human host.

BI 331-BI 332 HUMAN ANATOMY & PHYSIOLOGY I AND II & LAB

The structure and function of human cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems are considered. The interdependence of these systems is emphasized and related to the total field of biology. Laboratory work includes the dissection of a typical mammal and completion of classical experiments of physiology.

BI 344 NUTRITION

An introduction to the science of nutrition focusing on biochemical foundations (carbohydrates, fats, proteins, vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals) as they apply to human health (diet, physical activity, and healthful considerations for, for example, fluid balance, and bone and blood health). Eating disorders, food safety, nutrition through the life cycle, and global/cultural considerations are also covered. This course will be offered in alternating years.

BI 421-422 INDEPENDENT RESEARCH IN BIOLOGY

Individualized research experience in the biological sciences, under the direction of a science faculty member.

BI 451, BI 452, BI 453 BIOLOGY INTERNSHIP

Qualified students may be offered the opportunity to develop, with the aid of the chairperson of the department, an internship experience relevant to their academic needs. Assessment will be based on a portfolio that includes the agency's outcome assessment, the student's objective and subjective journal, and a primary-source referenced term paper in an area allied to the internship. Contact Prof. Daniel Lavoie (641-7161 or  DLavoie@Anselm.Edu for more information and to apply for internships before registering.

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Chemistry


CH 130-CH 131: GENERAL CHEMISTRY I AND II & LAB

The principles of chemistry with emphasis on the pertinent aspects of chemical theory and behavior. The descriptive chemistry of the more common elements is investigated and correlated to their structures, reactivity and properties. The laboratory work is largely quantitative with particular emphasis on scientific observation, recording of data, and evaluation of results.

CH 250-251: ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I AND II & LAB

A study of the structure, nomenclature, preparations, characterization methods and reactions of organic compounds. Modern theories and reaction mechanisms will be used as unifying bases.

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Computer Science


CS 101: DIGITAL LITERACY

Computers and their applications are at the center of our everyday lives. In this course, we explore what it means to communicate effectively and engage in critical thinking and problem solving using computers as a creative tool. Students learn how to analyze information and problem solve using Word Processing, Spreadsheet, Presentation, Database, Cloud Computing, Wiki/Blog and GIS to visualize, organize, present, document, explain, and query information. Students also learn how to create basic web pages in order to share them with a greater audience.

CS 210: INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEMS (GIS)

This course serves as an introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students will be introduced to the fundamental principal and practices of GIS. This course will focus on spatial data development and analysis of this data. Topics covered will include basic data structures, data sources, data collection, data quality, understanding     maps, building a GIS, Global Navigation Satellite Systems, digital data, attribute data and tables, and basic spatial analysis. Courses open to all majors - no prerequisite.

CS 481: INTERNSHIP (one course)

Students are placed in a field experience situation with corporations in the Greater Manchester area. Students earn a letter grade. Prerequisite: Permission of both the coordinator and the chair of the Computer Science Department

CS 482-483: INTERNSHIP (two courses)

Students are placed in a field experience situation with corporations in the Greater Manchester area. CS482 and CS483 can only be taken concurrently. CS482 is graded on a pass/fail basis. Students earn a letter grade for CS483.

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Criminal Justice


CJ 101: INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM

Traces the history and philosophy of criminal justice, considers constitutional limitations, studies the roles of varies agencies, reviews the process of justice, and evaluates modern criminal justice.

CJ 105: THEORIES OF CRIME

This course traces the history of criminological thought, and investigates the philosophical, biological, psychological and sociological explanations of crime.  Special attention is given to theory construction, the evaluation of theory, and the policy and methodological implications of different types of theories.

CJ 200: STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE

This course involves the application of statistical techniques to social science data as typically illustrated in the research and writing of Criminal Justice professionals. As a course for majors, it represents an important part of the student's methodological training with respect to the statistical analysis of data typically used by social scientists. Students are expected to carry out a number of exercises involving the statistical analysis of data and to interpret the results. The course covers widely used statistical techniques including descriptive and inferential statistics, hypothesis testing, cross­tabulation, correlation, and linear regression.

CJ 450: CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP

Internships with local, state and federal criminal justice agencies are available to students of all majors and class levels. The student must spend 40 hours per week with the agency and write a research paper.  Twelve credits are awarded for the successful completion of the program. Contact Prof. Elaine Rizzo (641-7078 or erizzo @anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for the Internship before registering.

CJ 451: CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP

Internships with local, state and federal criminal justice agencies are available to students of all majors and class levels. The student must spend 20 hours per week with the agency and write a research paper.  Six credits are awarded for the successful completion of the program. Contact Prof. Elaine Rizzo (641-7078 or erizzo @anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for the Internship before registering.

CJ 453: CRIMINAL JUSTICE INTERNSHIP

Available only to students who have successfully completed a six credit Criminal Justice Internship. The student must spend 20 hours per week with the agency and write a research paper. Six credits are awarded for the successful completion of the program. Contact Prof. Elaine Rizzo (641-7078 or erizzo @anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for the Internship before registering.

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Economics and Business


EC 111: FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING

Presents accounting concepts leading to the preparation of a company's financial statements. Reviews the importance of good accounting information for the capital market and for proper decision making within a company. At the end of the course, a student should be able to prepare financial statements for a small company.

EC 112: COST ACCOUNTING
Presents the processes by which a company determines the cost of a product or service and the various internal reporting mechanisms to allow management to make proper business decisions. The development of the various components leading to an operating plan for a company are presented. Additionally, common business decisions faced by a company are reviewed.

EC 141: PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS: MICRO

Examines the concept of the firm and the way it operates in the economy. Topics such as price determination, resource allocation, costs, and welfare are examined.

EC 142: PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS: MACRO

Designed to give students a basic understanding of the national economy through a study of economic theory.    Topics include unemployment, inflation, economic growth, the business cycle, and government stabilization policy.

EC 481: INTERNSHIP

Students intern with businesses, organizations and/or companies throughout the United States. Students must complete at least 120 hours at the internship site, as well as complete academic assignments to successfully meet the requirements of the course. This course is worth three credits at completion and students receive a letter grade. Contact Alane De Luca (641-7310 or adeluca@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

EC 215: ACCOUTING INFORMATION SYSTEM

Examines typical business processes, including Sales/Accounts Receivable/ Collections and Purchases/Accounts Payable/Payment. Objectives and procedures of internal control, business documents and reports as well as proper system documentation through flow-charts and other techniques will be examined. Hands-on experience will provide exposure to a Computer Based Accounting Information System. Requires computer work in class. If the class is not scheduled to meet in a computer lab, students will be expected to bring a laptop or other computer that can run Excel and download software intended for use in a PC.

EC 485: INTERNSHIP

Students intern with businesses, organizations and/or companies throughout the United States. Students must complete at least 120 hours at the internship site, as well as complete academic assignments to successfully meet the requirements of the course. This course is worth three credits at completion and students receive a letter grade. Contact Alane De Luca (641-7310 or adeluca@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

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Education


ED 450: METHODS OF TEACHING ELEMENTARY SOCIAL STUDIES AND SCIENCE

Methods of Teaching Elementary Social Studies and Science provides an integrative approach to ensure teachers a broad knowledge base when they enter the classroom.

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English


EN 103: FRESHMAN ENGLISH

This course designed to help students become better thinkers, readers and writers and to initiate the training they need to satisfy the demands of their college education. It focuses primarily on the writing process and the interrelated stages of that process. The second semester also introduces students to research methods.

EN 221: PUBLIC SPEAKING

This course stresses building effective speaking skills necessary for professional careers and participation in civic life. Students learn various strategies that are available for assessing and meeting the demands of speaking situations. Assignments include a series of informative, persuasive, and commemorative speeches.

EN 251: SHAKESPEARE

Close reading of representative comedies, histories and tragedies.

EN 481- EN 482: INTERNSHIP

Student-originated internships, supervised by the English Department, in areas of communication, publishing, journalism, and theater.

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Fine Arts


FAH 101: INTRODUCTION TO ART

An introduction to the language and history of the visual arts, including the visual elements, media and methods used by artists, and a chronological survey of the major periods, artists and works in the history of art. Open to students from all backgrounds with no previous experience in the visual arts necessary.

FAS 110: DRAWING I

A beginning level course open to students with little or no visual arts experience. The methods of rendering a variety of subjects, including still-life, portrait and human figure in a variety of drawing media. The works of contemporary and historical artists are examined through slide lectures. Studio and materials fees charged.

FAS 220: PAINTING I

The principles of color theory and composition are explored in this introduction to the materials and tools of oil painting. Students work from life to create still lifes, portraits, figure studies, and landscapes. Studio work is complemented by readings, critical writings, museum visits, and discussion of artistic works of the past and present. In addition to the studio fee, students are responsible for purchase of paints and some supplies.

FAS 240: PHOTOGRAPHY I

An introduction to black-and-white photography, including the history, technique, and aesthetics of photography. Students are taught to operate a 35mm camera, develop black-and-white film, and make prints. Assignments stress the different elements involved in making a successful photograph. Students are expected to have their own manually operated 35mm camera. Studio and materials fees charged.

FAS 260: CERAMICS I

This introduction to ceramics will focus on studio work leading to the completion of several projects. Students will learn the basics of handbuilding, the potter's wheel, kiln firing, glazing, and surface embellishment. Class time will be made up of instructor's demonstrations, group critiques, viewing images/slides, and individual studio work. Projects will stress the sculptural potential of clay and the aesthetic merit of functional vessel making. Gallery and museum visits, introducing students to the work of contemporary clay artists, will provide inspiration and direction.

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History


HI 101: ORIGINS OF EUROPEAN CIVILIZATION

Western Civilization, from its Middle East origins to approximately 1600.

HI 199: AMERICA: ORIGINS TO WORLD POWER

This course covers crucial issues in U.S. History from the American Revolution to the 21st century, with a heavy focus on processes which created, challenged and changed the Constitution and on the United States' interactions with the rest of the world.

HI 374: ST: HOLLYWOOD AND U.S. HISTORY

Few institutions of pop culture loom larger in the popular imagination than movies. Since the advent of film, movies have reflected social, political, and cultural change, even as they have helped to shape values and ideas in American society at large. This course examines the phenomenon of Hollywood filmmaking and encourages students to "see" movies in a different way - as historical sources, windows through which we can understand the social, political, and cultural transformations of the twentieth-century America.

HI 378: MODERN CHINA, 1600-PRESENT

This course explores the history of China since approximately 1600, focusing on the transition from the Sino-centric world in existence when the Qing dynasty took power in 1644 to the challenges of European imperialism, republicanism and communism in the 19th and 20th centuries.    

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Math


MA 170 - MA 180: CALCULUS I & II

A study of the differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications. Topics in analytic geometry include a study of conics.

MA 210: CALCULUS III

A continuation of Mathematics 170-180. Topics include infinite sequences and series, vectors and vector calculus, and multivariable calculus.

MA 310: LINEAR ANALYSIS

A study of linear algebra with emphasis on its application to the solution of differential equations. Topics include linear systems, matrices, vector spaces, and linear transformations.

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Modern Languages and Literature


FR 201-FR 202: INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I & II

The student is required to undertake a thorough review of grammar, exercises in composition, intensive readings and translations, and correlated laboratory drills. The second semester emphasizes culture and civilization.

SP 201- SP 202: INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I & II

An integrated course for students having a basic command of Spanish. Later phases of the course include introduction to a variety of cultural and literary reading selection in Spanish.

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Philosophy


PH 105: PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE AND THE HUMAN PERSON

This introductory course deals with the traditional topics of speculative philosophy, pertaining to Nature, the human person, and God.

PH 107: ETHICS

A presentation of the principles of moral conduct and their application to specific cases, including a review of some of the major ethical theories.

PH 321: FORMAL LOGIC

A critical study of reasoning, including classical syllogistic logic, truth functional logic, formal fallacies, fallacies of ordinary language, and inductive reasoning.

PH 326: PHILOSOPHY OF GOD

A study of the fundamental philosophical questions regarding the existence and nature of God, our knowledge of God, and the character of religious belief.

PH 338: CONTEMPORARY IMAGES OF MAN IN FANTASY NOVELS

This course examines the Postmodern situation and the nature of the Human Person in four popular sets of Fantasy Novels. We reveal how we see the limitations contemporary life, man's place, and the nature of good and evil, by how we alter those limitations in stories that alter the fundamental metaphysical and moral features of our world. We will consider two sets of novels influenced by World War II: Tolkien's Lord of the Rings and C.S. Lewis's Narnia series, and contrast them with two recent series: Harry Potter by J.K. Rowling and The Golden Compass series by Philip Pullman. The course will examine what we think of the real, its metaphysics and moral structure, by how we conceive the unreal.

PH 342: EXISTENTIALISM

A survey of the existentialist philosophers, focusing on such issues as the meaning of existence, anxiety, individuality, authenticity, and the confrontation with death.

PH 467: PRECEPTORIAL: CRIME AND PUNISHMENT

This course examines the ethical justification for criminal punishment in general and capital punishment in particular.

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Politics


PO 480: GOVERNMENT INTERNSHIP

Students are placed in a federal or state government agency. This course is worth three credits at completion. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (222-4151 or jlucas@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internships before registering.

PO 485: GOVERNMENT INTERNSHIP

Students are placed in a federal or state government agency. This course is worth a total of six credits at completion. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (222-4151 or jlucas@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internships before registering.

PO 487- PO 488 - PO 489: WASHINGTON INTERNSHIP

Students are placed in a federal agency in Washington, D.C. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas at (222-4151 or jlucas@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internships before registering.

PO 494: CAMPAIGN INTERNSHIP

Students work with a national, state or local campaign for a candidate for public office. Contact Professor Jennifer Lucas (222-4151 or jlucas@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for Internships before registering.

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Psychology


PY 101: GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY I

Introduces the student to the science of human and animal behavior. The scientific basis of psychology is examined. Basic topics covered are biological and cognitive foundations of behavior, individual differences, measurement techniques, personality theories and development, motivation and emotion, normal vs. abnormal behavior, perception, social behavior and learning.

PY 202: CHILD PSYCHOLOGY

The psychological development of the individual from conception to pre-adolescence, including areas of cognition, personality, learning, as well as the physical and the emotional development of the child.

PY 205: PSYCHOLOGY OF ADDICTION AND DEPENDENCY

The psychological aspects of addiction and dependency are surveyed. Substances that modify human behavior and emotions are studied as they relate to psychopathology and the functioning of the healthy individual. Psychological diagnosis and treatment of addiction and dependency are stressed.

PY 206: HEALTH PSYCHOLOGY

The role of psychological factors in four health-related areas: the prevention and treatment of mental and physical illness; the development of mental and physical illness; the promotion and maintenance of good health behavior; and the organization and formation of health-care policy and the health-care system. The student will be exposed to the underlying psychological theories and methods employed in this area, as well as their clinical applications.

PY 210: ST: TRAUMA AND FAMILY VIOLENCE

This course will expose students to the theoretical and practical foundations for understanding the sources and resolution of conflict and violence within and between groups, communities, and organizations. The history and evolution of Peace Psychology as a discipline will be examined. Applications to historical and current conflicts will be reviewed. Conflict resolution techniques will be modeled and applied through course didactics, readings, and role plays.

PY 305: BEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE

This course introduces the neurobiological foundations of mental processes and behavior. In addition to the mechanics and gross anatomy of the regulatory systems, topics covered in this course include: sensory systems, motivational systems (e.g., sleep and hunger), emotion, memory and psychopathology.

PY 307: ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

The classifications and incidence of behavioral disorders. Issues of etiology, causes of abnormality, methods of treatment and clinical diagnosis are discussed.

PY 313: PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING AND MOTIVATION

Traditional approaches to studying the science of behavior are discussed including classical (Pavlovian) conditioning, operant conditioning, and their interactions. Several laboratory projects are conducted throughout this course. Many applications of learning theory are also entertained. Additional topics include motivation, emotion, drives, and incentive learning. Major theorists and their contributions to learning theory are discussed.

PY 402- PY 403: INTERNSHIP

Qualified students may be offered the opportunity to work as interns in agencies which offer significant roles for psychologists, e.g., schools, clinics, rehabilitation centers, or in industry or other typical organizations which offer opportunities to integrate academic studies in the liberal arts and in psychology with the practical aspects available in the site locations. These courses are worth 3 credits each at completion. Contact Paul Finn (641-7131 or pfinn@anselm.edu) for more information and to apply for internship before registering.

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Sociology


SO 101: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY

An introduction to the scientific study of human behavior in its social context. It explores the nature of social interaction, social structures and processes, and social institutions. It introduces basic sociological principles, methods, and major social theories.

SO 454: SOCIOLOGY INTERNSHIP

Provides qualified students with supervised experience in a professional setting to enhance the academic learning received in the classroom.  It may include work experience in human service, a business environment, or government agency.  Participation may take such forms as a supervised case worker, research analyst, or other approved roles.  This internship is worth 6 credits at completion. Contact Dennis MacDonald (dmacdona@anselm.edu ) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

SO 455: SOCIOLOGY INTERNSHIP

Provides qualified students with supervised experience in a professional setting to enhance the academic learning received in the classroom.  It may include work experience in human service, a business environment, or government agency.  Participation may take such forms as a supervised case worker, research analyst, or other approved roles.  This internship is worth 3 credits at completion. Contact Dennis MacDonald (dmacdona@anselm.edu ) for more information and to apply for Internship before registering.

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Theology


TH 100: BIBLICAL THEOLOGY

An introduction to Divine Revelation enabling students to gain an understanding of the total Bible - the Old Testament and the New Testament.

TH 270: CHRISTIAN MORAL LIFE

This course examines the Eucharistic character of Christian moral life. It studies the virtues of this life, precepts derived from Scripture and the teaching tradition of the Church, the application of these precepts to contemporary issues, and the nourishing of moral life through the Sacraments.

TH 371: MEDICAL ETHICS

An investigation of the moral problems which can arise in the practice of modern medicine. A brief historical survey of medical ethics is followed by a study of the basic Christian principles of morality. Questions discussed include the concept of health and illness, the inception, preservation, and termination of human life.

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