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Private Scholarships

Apply early in the cycle. Most scholarship applications are due by May 1 or earlier for the following fall semester. Note: We do not endorse any particular scholarship program but offer these as a place to begin your search.


NASFAA/Peterson’s Guide www.collegequest.com
College Board Scholarship Search www.collegeboard.com/paying
FastWeb (Financial Aid Search Through the Web) www.fastweb.com
New Hampshire Charitable Foundation www.nhcf.org
Hispanic Scholarship Fund www.hsf.net
Dollars for Scholars www.scholarshipamerica.org
Scholar Aid www.scholaraid.com
Wired Scholar www.wiredscholar.com
Hispanic Association of Colleges & Universities www.hacu.net
CampusRN newhampshire.campusrn.com
Scholarship Resource Network Express www.srnexpress.com

Many Web sites search for college-specific scholarships. For example, FastWeb combs college catalogues looking for any scholarships a school might list. When you search FastWeb, you’ll receive a list of many of Saint Anselm College’s endowed scholarships. It will ask students to contact the Office of Financial Aid for more information. There is no separate application for Saint Anselm College endowed scholarships with the exception of a few that students must be nominated by faculty and administration to receive. In general, these are restricted, need-based resources that we use to fund appropriate candidates.

Saint Anselm College is a collegiate matching partner in the Dollars for Scholars (Citizen's Scholarship Foundation of America) Program. We will match up to $1,000 of your Dollars for Scholars Scholarship provided you complete and send us the Matching Grant Form. The College will follow the Dollars for Scholars guidelines of eliminating unmet need, loan and work before adjusting grant aid.

Don’t forget to check school and local libraries, local business and civic organizations, parishes, and parents’ employers for scholarship applications. In addition, Saint Anselm College posts scholarship opportunities on the bulletin board outside the Office of Financial Aid.

Do not pay anyone who claims to be holding a scholarship for you. If you have to pay to claim it, it is probably a scam.

The Federal Trade Commission cautions that perpetrators of financial aid fraud often use these telltale lines:

  • The scholarship is guaranteed or your money back
  • You can't get this information anywhere else
  • I just need your credit card or bank account number to hold this scholarship
  • We'll do all the work
  • The scholarship will cost some money
  • You've been selected by a "national foundation" to receive a scholarship or "You're a finalist," in a contest you never entered
To file a complaint, or for free information, students or parents should visit www.ftc.gov/scholarshipscams.